THREE TERRORISTS AND FOUR HOSTAGES DEAD

Bloody end to French sieges as commandos storm kosher deli and printing firm where magazine assassins and policewoman’s killer were holed up – but FEMALE accomplice is on the run 

  • Brothers Said and Cherif Kouachi were killed as they tried to fight their way out of a print works 25 miles from Paris
  • Fellow jihadi Amedy Coulibay also killed after taking hostages at a Jewish grocery shop in east of city
  • His girlfriend Hayat Boumeddiene, described as armed and dangerous, is still on the run
  • Four hostages died at grocery shop while Michel Catalano, who was held by Kouachi brothers escaped unharmed 
  • First chilling images inside kosher grocery show bodies of hostages lying on the ground 
  • All three dead terrorists were born in France but linked to same terror cell 

Three Islamic jihadists were dead tonight after special forces brought an end to more than two days of slaughter which have left at least 17 dead and spread terror across France.

Said and Cherif Kouachi, the brothers who had assassinated 12 people at satirical magazine Charlie Hebdo, died in a blaze of gunfire at a printworks near Paris where they had been holed up with one hostage, who survived.

Moments later, dozens of commandos stormed a Jewish grocery 25 miles away in east Paris where accomplice Amedey Coulibaly was threatening to kill 15 terrified captives, including women and children.

In an earlier phone call to a journalist, Coulibaly confirmed that he was in contact with the Kouachis and the attacks had been ‘synchronised’. He said he had sworn allegiance to Islamic State in Iraq and had targeted the shop because ‘it was Jewish’

The 32-year-old, responsible for the death of a woman police officer on Thursday, was also ‘neutralised’ in the assault. But his 27-year-old girlfriend Hayat Boumeddiene – described as ‘armed and dangerous’ is on the run.

Witnesses watched in horror as freed hostages fled the scene screaming, some carrying their children in their arms. ‘It’s war!” screamed a mother as she dragged her daughter from the scene.

It emerged tonight that four people had been killed while another five are critically wounded. As many as 30 had survived by hiding in a cold store where they kept silent for hours.

Relief: Two hostages leave with their young child after a terrifying day trapped inside the store

A man carrying a small child is seen fleeing from the ordeal moments after police stormed the kosher grocery store in eastern Paris

Relief: Two hostages leave with their young child (left) and a man carrying a small child is seen fleeing from the ordeal (right) after police stormed the kosher grocery store in eastern Paris

Going in: Special forces storm the Jewish grocery to the east of Paris where terrorist Amedey Coulibaly had taken hostages

Going in: Special forces storm the Jewish grocery to the east of Paris where terrorist Amedey Coulibaly had taken hostages

Chilling: The body of a man can be seen at the entrance of the Jewish supermarket after it was stormed by commandos

Chilling: The body of a man can be seen at the entrance of the Jewish supermarket after it was stormed by commandos

Terrified: Hostages - who had been held for hours with Coulibaly threatening to kill them - flee from the shop, crying with relief

Terrified: Hostages – who had been held for hours with Coulibaly threatening to kill them – flee from the shop, crying with relief

Running to safety: Police escort seven hostages freed from the kosher grocers, including one woman who had to be carried

Running to safety: Police escort seven hostages freed from the kosher grocers, including one woman who had to be carried

The bloody climax to the terrorists’ rampage began at around 4.30pm when the Kouachi brothers came out firing’ Kalashnikovs as officers launched an assault on a building in Dammartin-en-Goele, north-east of Paris.

Commandos were seen rappelling from a Puma helicopter on to the roof as flash bang grenades were hurled at the factory to disorientate the jihadists, who had been inside for nine hours. Explosions and automatic gunfire could be heard up to a mile away.

Said, 34, and Cherif, 32, were both killed. They had earlier told police that they were ‘ready to die as martyrs’.

One officer from the elite GIGN commando unit is thought to have been injured, while hostage Michel Catalano – the manager of a design company – escaped unharmed.

Shortly after her husband was freed, an emotional Veronique Catalano was waiting to speak to him. ‘We very reassured and feel very relieved that it’s all over’, she said from her home in Othis.

‘We’re still waiting for news. We’re not all back together yet.’

It also emerged that the police were aided by a 27-year-old graphic designer who hid inside a box with his phone for more than six hours.

Amedy Coulibaly

Hayat Boumeddiene

Dead: Amedey Coulibaly was shot dead after taking at least six hostages at a grocery store in east Paris. He is believed to be have been working with his girlfriend Hayat Boumeddiene (right) who was said to be ‘armed and dangerous’

Cherif Kouachi

Said Kouachi

Dead: Cherif Kouachi (left), 32, and his brother Said (right) were killed in a firefight with French special forces at a industrial site

Back in Paris, the grocery shop siege was also headling towards a bloody climax. Commandos are said to have hacked in the CCTV of the supermarket, and also communicated with one of the hostages by mobile phone.

Coulibaly, meanwhile, gave an interview to a French TV station at the height of the siege where he swore alliegance to Islamic State and said the three days of mayhem had been ‘synchronised’.

He confirmed he had shot a policewoman in the south of Paris the previous day and said his terror attacks were synchronised with the Kouachi brothers. ‘Them Charlie Hebdo; me the police,’ he said.

Around 15 minutes after are the Kouachi brothers were killed, dozens of officers poured into the shop amid a hail of gunfire and loud explosions which rocked surrounding streets. The shopfront was suddenly lit up by a fireball.Two policemen fell to the floor injured.

Ambulances raced to the scene, joining a jam of police vans and other emergency vehicles, all under the eye of helicopters.

As hostages broke free, an astonishing story emerged of how dozens had hidden in a walk-in freezer, cowering in minus three temperatures and praying they would not be found.

Bloody climax: A huge ball of fire erupts amid gunfire and explosions as French special forces shoot dead the two Charlie Hebdo gunmen

Bloody climax: A huge ball of fire erupts amid gunfire and explosions as French special forces shoot dead the two Charlie Hebdo gunmen

In their sights: Police train their weapons on the building where the Charlie Hebdo gunmen were holed up with a hostage in Dammartin-en-Goele

In their sights: Police train their weapons on the building where the Charlie Hebdo gunmen were holed up with a hostage in Dammartin-en-Goele

One of the shoppers, 36-year-old father of four Johan Dorre was able to call a friend on his mobile phone to tell him they were trapped two floors below the ground floor, where 15 hostages were held at gunpoint.

Then as the siege unfolded he called his uncle, who offered words of comfort as he waited behind police barriers with hundreds of anxious residents of the quarter whose homes had been evacuated by police.

‘Johan and the others were terrified that they would be discovered by the terrorists and were forced to huddle together like frightened animals to avoid hypothermia’, another uncle Jacob Katorza told the Daily Mail last night just minutes after hearing that his nephew had been freed unharmed.

‘He was shopping for the kosher cakes and meat delicacies which we Jewish people enjoy on the holy day when he heard shots being fired above on the groiund floor and immediately took cover with other shoppers in the basement .

‘Johan was to speak to my brother Haim by phone for only two or three minutes and told him to stay quiet and wait until help arrived.

‘Then we just stood at the barriers for five hours and waited for news. It was terrible- the longest five hours of my life.’

Explosion: The street is rocked during the final stages of the siege which left four hostages dead

Explosion: The street is rocked during the final stages of the siege which left four hostages dead

Assault force: Special forces line up to enter the premises through a backdoor as the street is rocked by explosions

Assault force: Special forces line up to enter the premises through a backdoor as the street is rocked by explosions

Front door: Officers were also seen pouring in through the front door at the denouement of the siege

Front door: Officers were also seen pouring in through the front door at the denouement of the siege

Run for safety: Officers and hostages mill around outside the grocers in the aftermath of the raid

Run for safety: Officers and hostages mill around outside the grocers in the aftermath of the raid

Coulibay had warned he would kill all of his hostages if police launched an assault on the Kouachis. It is unclear if he had carried out his threat before police moved in.

Both Cherif Kouachi and Coulibaly had spoken to journalists by phone earlier today. Kouachi knew he was talking to a journalist and the conversation was recorded.

He said: ‘I am a defender of the prophet. I was sent by Al Qaeda of Yemen. I’m financed by Imam Anwar al Awlaqi. Anwar is a (preacher)’.

Koucahi went on to claim that the journalists he had killed at Charlie Hebdo were not civilians but legitimate targets.

In a separate phone call, Coulibaly confirmed that he was in contact with the Kouachis and that the attacks had been ‘synchronised’. He said that he had swore allegiance to Islamic State in Iraq and had targeted the shop because ‘it was Jewish’

Cherifa Baoudi, a 48-year-old mother who lives opposite the kosher grocer told the Mail of how she heard screams and thought people were joking in the street.

Moments later police vans charged down the street and surrounded the building.

‘I heard screams and I said it must have been shouting outside. Then we saw police and we knew it must be terrorists.’

She added: ‘Police came into our house and were trying to find out what was happening.

More than four hours later, Mrs Baoudi said she saw Amedy Coulibaly come out of the shop with his hands in the air.

She said : ‘I could see him through the window and then he came out with his hands in the air. Then , the police took him. I am so glad I didn’t go out. I was so scared. I called the school. I wanted to be sure my children were safe.’

Mrs Bouadi said that she will never be able to forget yesterday’s events. She said: ‘It’s going to stay with us for a very long time. It was barbaric – no religion tells people to kill.’

Millions had watched gripped on television as the three day manhunt for the terrorists had ended in bloody shootouts, car chases and sieges.

At one point seven helicopters and more than 50 police and military vehicles had been involved in a high speeds case during which shots were fired after the Kouchais broke cover from a forest where they had been sheltering 50 miles north east of Paris.

They were forced in to the industrial estate at Dammartin-en-Goele where they made their last stand.

Local residents were evacuated or ordered to lock themselves in their homes as what was described as ‘a small army’ of soldiers and police surrounded them, throwing a cordon around the area.

‘They said they want to die as martyrs,’ Yves Albarello, a local lawmaker who was inside the command post claimed.

Speaking tonight, French President Francois Hollande spoke to the nation promising ‘all necessary measures will be used’ to protect the French people and called on them to remain united in ‘these difficult times.’

He said the attacks had been carried out by fanatics who had nothing to do with Islam and said the assault on the grocery shop was ‘anti-semetic.’

The country must remain vigilant against the possibility of further attacks, he stressed.

Relief: Two hostages leave with their young child after a terrifying day trapped inside the store

Relief: Two hostages leave with their young child after a terrifying day trapped inside the store

A man carrying a small child is seen fleeing from the ordeal moments after police stormed the kosher grocery store in eastern Paris

A man carrying a small child is seen fleeing from the ordeal moments after police stormed the kosher grocery store in eastern Paris

The man is pictured in a second shot, carrying a small child in his arms while the kosher grocery remains illuminated behind him

The man is pictured in a second shot, carrying a small child in his arms while the kosher grocery remains illuminated behind him

Philippe Lapotre, 63, was at his home across a field from the factory when he heard the explosions followed by gun fire and came out to see.

‘My friends and family have been calling me all day to see if I was ok,’ he said. ‘When I came out, three huge Puma helicopters came over.’

Carole and Thierry Charpentier were at home when the siege ended. ‘We have been at home, just watching the television all day,’ said Mrs Charpentier.

‘We are so very relieved it is over, and are glad the police have got the suspects and the hostage is free.

‘We would like the thank and praise the police and the special forces. But we are angry too, that this had happened. We are angry at what horrible things they have done’.

In Paris, police say Coulibaly, 32, was using the hostages as a bargaining chip to try to scupper the police response further north.

Frantic: Police rush to the scene of the hostage-taking at an industrial estate in Dammartin-en-Goele around 25 miles from Paris

Frantic: Police rush to the scene of the hostage-taking at an industrial estate in Dammartin-en-Goele around 25 miles from Paris

Siege: The gunmen are surrounded by police commandos who have begun negotiations to try to secure the release of the hostage

Siege: The gunmen are surrounded by police commandos who have begun negotiations to try to secure the release of the hostage

Trapped: The brothers were cornered in the premises of a printing firm after leading police on a dramatic car chase 

Trapped: The brothers were cornered in the premises of a printing firm after leading police on a dramatic car chase

Scoping it out: Police and armed forces take up positions in Dammartin-en-Goele after landing by helicopter in fields near the hostage scene

Scoping it out: Police and armed forces take up positions in Dammartin-en-Goele after landing by helicopter in fields near the hostage scene

He was said to be working with a woman called Hayat Boumeddiene, 26, considered ‘armed and dangerous’, and is said to have yelled at police: ‘You know who I am’ when they responded to the shooting.

MailOnline understands that police had earlier scrambled phone signals in the area after the gunmen contacted Coulibay while inside the building.

Revelations that a call was made by the Kouachis suggests they may have instructed Coulibay to carry out today’s atrocity to leverage their escape.

There were reports of another alert near the Eiffel Tower, with police seen training their guns down the stairs of a Metro station, but it was a false alarm.

Local media reports that the brothers met Coulibay while in prison.

He is believed to be a fellow member of the Buttes Chaumont – a gang from the 19th arrondissement of Paris that sent jihadists to fight in Iraq.

The Kouachis were cornered in Dammartin-en-Goele, around 25 miles from the capital, this morning after leading police on a dramatic car chase.

After exchanging gunfire with officers, they fled on foot into printing works where they are holding a hostage, believed to be a 26-year-old male.

After a meeting with President Hollande when news of the siege broke, MP Nicolas Dupont-Aignan said: 'It’s time to terrorise the terrorists'

After a meeting with President Hollande when news of the siege broke, MP Nicolas Dupont-Aignan said: ‘It’s time to terrorise the terrorists’

Hemmed in: Police officers create a ring of steel around the industrial estate where the Charlie Hebdo killers are holding a hostage

Hemmed in: Police officers create a ring of steel around the industrial estate where the Charlie Hebdo killers are holding a hostage

MailOnline understands police scrambled phone signals in the area after the gunmen made contact with a fellow jihadist from the building

MailOnline understands police scrambled phone signals in the area after the gunmen made contact with a fellow jihadist from the building

How three days of terror unfolded after gunmen first stormed the Charlie Hebdo offices in Paris on Wednesday 

How three days of terror unfolded after gunmen first stormed the Charlie Hebdo offices in Paris on Wednesday

A salesman called Didier later told how he was supposed to meet a client called Michel at the print works, but was instead met by one of the gunmen.

He said he shook hands with the militant because he had identified himself as a police officer and was carrying a Kalashnikov rifle.

He said: ‘When I arrived, my client came out with an armed man who said he was from the police.

‘My client told me to leave so I left,’ Didier said, identifying the man he was to meet with as Michel.’

He said the black-clad man who was wearing a bullet-proof vest told him: ‘Leave, we don’t kill civilians anyhow’.

‘That really struck me,’ Didier added. ‘So I decided to call the police. I guess it was one of the terrorists.

‘It could have been a policeman if he hadn’t told me “we don’t kill civilians”. They were heavily armed like elite police.’

‘I didn’t know it was a hostage situation, or a robbery. I just knew something wasn’t quite right. I think I am going to go and see my colleagues and play the lottery because I was very lucky this morning.’

Meanwhile, a worker in a nearby building told how he barricaded the doors as the hostage crisis unfolded.

He said: ‘None of us feel safe. We can hear the helicopters. It is terrifying.’

One of the pupils inside the Dammartin-en-Goele school said by phone from inside: ‘We’re scared. We’ve called our parents to make sure they’re OK.

‘We’ve been told we have to stay inside. All the lights have been switched off.’

On guard: A police officer stands along a road near the industrial estate in Dammartin-en-Goele, some 25 miles north-east of Paris

On guard: A police officer stands along a road near the industrial estate in Dammartin-en-Goele, some 25 miles north-east of Paris

Police check vehicles near the industrial estate. Residents were warned to stay indoors and pupils were being kept inside school

Police check vehicles near the industrial estate. Residents were warned to stay indoors and pupils were being kept inside school

WORKER TELLS OF HIS LUCKY ESCAPE AFTER SHAKING HANDS WITH HOSTAGE GUNMAN

A salesman has told how he shook hands with one of the gunman when they arrived at the print works thinking he was a police officer.

He said: ‘When I arrived my client came out with an armed man who said he was from the police.

‘My client told me to leave so I left,’ Didier said, identifying the man he was to meet with as Michel.

‘I was in front of the door. I shook Michel’s hand and I shook the hand of one of the terrorists.’

He said the black-clad man who was wearing a bullet-proof vest and carrying what looked like a Kalashnikov rifle told him: ‘Leave, we don’t kill civilians anyhow’.

‘That really struck me,’ Didier added. ‘So I decided to call the police. I guess it was one of the terrorists.

‘It could have been a policeman if he hadn’t told me “we don’t kill civilians”. They were heavily armed like elite police.’

‘I didn’t know it was a hostage situation, or a robbery. I just knew something wasn’t quite right.

‘I think I am going to go and see my colleagues and play the lottery because I was very lucky this morning.’

Snipers had their weapons trained on the building and helicopters were hovering overhead as negotiations were underway with the Islamic fanatics.

Runways have been closed at Charles de Gaulle airport, around five miles away over fears the gunmen have rocket launchers that can down planes.

Police confirmed a hostage had been taken and that officers are ‘trying to establish contact’ with the suspects.

The family of Michel Catalano, the director of the firm at the centre of the siege told Le Figaro newspaper that they had not spoken to him since this morning and feared he may be the hostage.

Mr Catalano and his wife Veronique live in Othis, less than four miles from the scene.

After a meeting with President Hollande when news of the siege broke, politician Nicolas Dupont-Aignan said: ‘It’s time to terrorise the terrorists.’

Referring to Islam, Prime Minister Manuel Valls said: ‘We are in a war against terrorists, we’re not in a war with religion.’

An Interior Ministry source confirmed that the men had said they were ‘ready to die as martyrs’.

Prior to the standoff, the suspects hijacked a Peugeot 206 from a woman in Ermenonville Forest, close to the village of Montagny-Sainte-Felicite, agyer abandoning their Renualt Clio.

A teacher named Charlene Blondelle was driving to work in the morning when she saw two men with guns stop the vehicle in front of her.

It was only when she got to work at the village school that she realised the two heavily-armed men were the Kouachi brothers.

Jean Paul Douet, the mayor of the village, said Charlene saw the two men force the woman out of the car and sit in the back seat.

It is thought that she was later let out of the car as the men continued their journey to Dammartin-en-Goele.

Both women are with police officers in Nanteuil-le-Haudouin. It is not thought that the woman sustained any injuries.

Mr Douet told MailOnline: ‘The car was taken at around 8.10am. The village teacher arrived at her school to see a car being hijacked in front of her.

‘She saw their weapons, and in particular their rocket-propelled grenade launcher.’

French media reported the brothers were in a car when they came upon her and abandoned that to use hers instead.

She recognised them as the wanted men, a police source said.

A spokesman for the Ministry of the Interior said there was an exchange of gunfire with police who were manning a roadblock on the N2 motorway as the brother sped towards Paris.

He told France Info radio that no-one was injured in the clash.

Holed up: The gunmen escaped on foot into a small printing business (above) called Creating Trend Discovery, just before 9am GMT

Holed up: The gunmen escaped on foot into a small printing business (above) called Creating Trend Discovery, just before 9am GMT

Terror in the midst: Dammartin-en-Goele is in lockdown, with children in its three schools being kept inside for their own protection

Terror in the midst: Dammartin-en-Goele is in lockdown, with children in its three schools being kept inside for their own protection

Dozens of police then pursued the brothers along the National 2 highway, ending in Dammartin-en-Goele, close to the area where the huge manhunt had been focused on a forest overnight.

They escaped on foot with a hostage into a small printing business named Creating Trend Discovery, just before 10am (9am GMT).

Residents were warned on the town’s official website to stay indoors and pupils were being kept inside school.

Natoly Ratsimbazasy, a hairdresser in Dammartan-en-Goele, said the town – of 6,000 inhabitants – was deserted.

He told MailOnline: ‘It is very quiet in the centre. We have all been told to stay indoors and away from the windows. They have sealed off the area. We are all very scared, especially for the children. We don’t know how this is all going to end.’

A restaurateur in the town said: ‘It is insane what is happening, I can’t believe it.’

Universities and schools in the surroundings of the hostage crisis are shut for the day.

Student Nishanth Selvakumer, 20, said: ‘Every one is so shocked. There is not much work in Dammartain so most people work on the industrial estate.

‘In the village, they have been told to stay in their homes and stay away from the windows. The schools are all shut and the universities too.’

Rayane Bouallayuer, 18, said his 11-year-old sister and his father were barricaded into the school.

‘My sister went to school at 8am but at 9am we saw on TV that the suspects came here so my father went to get her. Now they cannot leave.’

‘The teachers have spoken to the kids and explained to them what happened in Paris. Yesterday they had a minutes silence at school but I think today they are very scared. Some of them were crying.

‘My family is Muslim but these men are not real Muslims. They are not like me. They do not represent us. Now it is going to get much worse for us real Muslims in France. ‘

Stake out: Snipers train their weapons on the building as negotiations were underway with the Islamic fanatics

Stake out: Snipers train their weapons on the building as negotiations were underway with the Islamic fanatics

 A helicopter searching for Charlie Hebdo suspects hovers above Dammartin-en-Goele as the net closed in on the killers

 A helicopter searching for Charlie Hebdo suspects hovers above Dammartin-en-Goele as the net closed in on the killers

Universities and schools near the hostage scene have been shut as police set up a ring of steel around Dammartin-en-Goele 

Universities and schools near the hostage scene have been shut as police set up a ring of steel around Dammartin-en-Goele

Police vans are seen chasing the Charlie Hebdo killers amid fears they have taken hostages on a ‘martyrdom mission’ towards Paris

Carole Morais, who works in the town hall, said: ‘We’re locked in and following events on the internet’.

The hunt also affected flights at Charles de Gaulle airport in Paris, which closed two runways to arrivals to avoid interfering in the standoff or endangering planes.

The dramatic development came after thousands of police and soldiers had focused their hunt for the gunmen in a nearby forest amid fears they were planning a final ‘spectacular’ before capture.

The search for the gunmen last night focused on a cave in a vast forest in northern France, but had turned up nothing.

The pair left behind their identity cards in the Citroen they used for the massacre – a move which appeared deliberate, intelligence specialists said.

There was also no sign of the AK-47s and rocket launchers which they had earlier been seen with, suggesting they had taken them into the forest.

Police now fear they could take hostages or are planning a final ‘spectacular’ before capture as the search enters its third day.

Meanwhile, shots rang out close to the Porte de Vincennes in Paris as another hostage crisis unfolded.

‘There is a hostage situation – shots have been fired,’ said a Paris police spokesman, who said up to five people were originally being held in Vincennes and there were ‘believed to be two fatalities’.

French police have now named the suspected hostage taker as Amedy Coulibaly, 33, while his girlfriend, Hayat Boumeddiene, 26, is also believed to be involved.

Pictured: Police officer Clarissa Jean-Philippe was gunned down as she attended a routine traffic accident in Montrouge at 8am yesterday

Pictured: Police officer Clarissa Jean-Philippe was gunned down as she attended a routine traffic accident in Montrouge at 8am yesterday

Coulibay is believed to be the one responsible for shooting a policewoman dead in south Paris on Thursday.

The revelation has led police to link it to the murder of 12 people around the offices of the Charlie Hebdo satirical magazine on Wednesday.

Clarissa Jean-Philippe, 27, was unarmed and directing traffic in Montrouge, in south Paris, when she was gunned down by Coulibay, who was still wearing body armour and using an automatic assault rifle.

The murderer has been identified by police who said he belonged to the Buttes Chaumont network, which sent Jihadi fighters to Iraq.

‘He was in the same Buttes Chaumount cell as the Kouachi brothers,’ said a source close to the investigation. ‘He was friends of both of them.’

Two of Coulibay relatives were arrested in nearby Grigny during a police raid this morning.

Like the Kouachis, he is known to have been radicalised by an Islamic preacher in Paris, before expressing a wish to fight in Iraq or Syria.

Police officers stop two people on a scooter at gunpoint as they arrive near the scene of the hostage taking

Police officers stop two people on a scooter at gunpoint as they arrive near the scene of the hostage taking

The pair are aggressively wrestled to the ground by police officers tasked with preventing anyone coming and going from the scene

The pair are aggressively wrestled to the ground by police officers tasked with preventing anyone coming and going from the scene

Police cordons (pictured) have been established to surround the kosher bakery, where it's thought a woman and children are held captive

Police cordons (pictured) have been established to surround the kosher bakery, where it’s thought a woman and children are held captive

Unfolding terror: A graphic showing the developments since the shootings at the Charlie Hebdo offices in Paris on Wednesday morning

It came as Prime Minister Manuel Valls admitted the Kouachi brothers were on the radar of the intelligence services and ‘were likely’ to have been under surveillance before the atrocity.

Yesterday, the brothers abandoned their car near the village of Abbaye de Longpont shortly after robbing a petrol station yesterday.

Anti-terror officers found a jihadi flag and a Molotov cocktail in the Renault Clio the gunmen hijacked to escape the French capital – and two men fitting their descriptions were seen running into the Foret de Retz, which covers an area larger than Paris.

A petrol station attendant in Villers-Cotterets told police he had seen Kalashnikovs (AK-47s) and rocket launchers in the vehicle which had sped away after the men had stolen food and water.

There are fewer than 300 residents in Longpont and armed officers were carrying out house-to-house searches as helicopters with thermal imagery equipment capable of identifying human bodies among the trees were called in.

Last night, interior minister Bernard Cazeneuve said a total of nine people were now in custody and more than 90 witnesses had been interviewed.

When and why that surveillance was dropped were two of the many questions being asked yesterday as a senior American counter-terrorism official confirmed that the brothers were on the US no-fly list.

But officials were tight-lipped about what else they know about them, including whether they fought in the Middle East with extremist groups.

Grief-stricken: Jeannette Bougrab, the partner of 'Charb' – Stephane Charbonnier, the editor of Charlie Hebdo – joins a rally outisde the Paris City Hall. In an emotional interview, she said she always knew he would be assassinated

Grief-stricken: Jeannette Bougrab, the partner of ‘Charb’ – Stephane Charbonnier, the editor of Charlie Hebdo – joins a rally outisde the Paris City Hall. In an emotional interview, she said she always knew he would be assassinated

CNN reported that the US ‘was given information from the French intelligence agency that Said Kouachi traveled to Yemen as late as 2011 on behalf of the Al Qaeda affiliate there’.

The network said Said received a variety of weapons training from Al Qaeda in the Arabian Peninsula (AQAP), including on how to fire weapons. It added: ‘It is also possible Said was trained in bomb making.’

In 2008, Cherif Kouachi was sentenced to three years in jail for his association with an underground organisation.

‘While in jail, he came under the influence of the one-time British-based terrorist Djemal Beghal, who was sentenced to ten years in prison by the French courts for terrorist offenders.

But despite the security services knowing the men were radicalised and suspected of having been trained in military tactics in east Yemen by Al Qaeda, they were not under surveillance on Wednesday.

Last night there had already been several revenge attacks, with shots fired at a Muslim prayer room in the southern town of Port-la-Nouvelle.

A Muslim family was shot at in their car in Caromb, in southern Vaucluse, while ‘Death to Arabs’ was daubed on a mosque in Poitiers, central France.

FACES OF THE 12 VICTIMS OF THE CHARLIE HEBDO MASSACRE REVEALED

 

rench satirical weekly Charlie Hebdo's deputy chief editor Bernard Maris and cartoonists Georges Wolinski, Jean Cabut, aka Cabu, Charb, Tignous and Honore (Philippe Honore) 

rench satirical weekly Charlie Hebdo’s deputy chief editor Bernard Maris and cartoonists Georges Wolinski, Jean Cabut, aka Cabu, Charb, Tignous and Honore (Philippe Honore)

The names of the 12 people killed in cold by blood by three gunmen during a horrifying attack at the Charlie Hebdo offices on Wednesday morning have been revealed.

The dead include eight editorial staff, one worker, one visitor, one policeman, who was on the cartoonists’ security detail, and one policeman who was shot dead on the street.

Heroic Muslim police officer Ahmed Merabet, who was executed by a terrorist gunman on the streets of Paris while he begged for his life.

Shocking footage of the attack on the Charlie Hebdo office shows Mr Merabet on the ground and begging for mercy as he is killed casually by a gunshot to the head. Witnesses say he asked ‘do you want to kill me?’ before the gunman replied ‘OK, chief’.

It is understood that Mr Merabet was a married Parisian cycle cop assigned to the 11th arrondissement – the Paris neighbourhood where Charlie Hebdo’s office is located and known for its dining and fine wines.

As the French magazine vowed to publish next week in defiance of the massacre, one French mourner wrote: ‘Ahmed Merabet died protecting the innocent from hate. I salute him.’

Elsa Cyat was the only woman to die in the massacre

Elsa Cyat was the only woman to die in the massacre, while policeman Ahmed Merabet was shot dead in the streets

The second police officer to be killed in the attack was Franck Brinsolaro, 49, a brigadier and protection officer for the magazine’s editor Stephane Charbonnier.

The married 49-year-old lived in Bernay, France, and was the father of two children. His wife, Ingrid Brinsolaro, is editor of the Awakening Normand, Bernay, a newspaper that belongs to the group Publihebdos, as Hebdo de Sevre et Maine.

The team at Publihebdos have released a statement regarding the killing.

It read: ‘Publihebdos teams are in shock after the cowardly attack and great seriousness that hit Charlie Hebdo today.

‘This barbaric attack left many victims including a downed police was the husband of Ingrid Brinsolaro, our editor at Bernay. We are devastated and very sad.’

Mr Charbonnier, the defiant editor whose satirical newspaper dared to poke fun at everything from religion to feminism and spoke out fiercely against political correctness, was another of the 12 victims.

Just two years ago, the 47-year-old – nicknamed Charb – declared: ‘I am not afraid of retaliation. I have no children, no wife, no car, no credit,’ he said after receiving death threats two years ago. ‘It perhaps sounds a bit pompous, but I’d rather die standing than live on my knees.’

Mr Charbonnier, who took over as editor in 2009, grew up in Conflans-Sainte-Honorine, northern France and joined Charlie Hebdo in the early 1990s as a designer.

The magazine’s cartoonists were also targeted by the gunmen in the attack.

Jean ‘Cabu’ Cabut, the magazine’s 76-year-old lead cartoonist was an almost legendary cultural figure in France.

Known by the nickname ‘Cabu’, he was renowned for his quick wit and youthful style. He was also notorious for his drawing of Mohammed, which sparked fury after adorning the cover of Charlie Hebdo in 2006.

Despite all the controversy, Mr Cabut was insistent that art should not be constrained. Perhaps his most famous quote was: ‘Sometimes laughter can hurt – but laughter, humour and mockery are our only weapons.’

Georges Wolinski, an 80-year-old who was as renowned for his colourful home life as he was for being a ‘master of satirical illustration’.

Married twice, he once joked about his dying wish, saying: ‘I want to be cremated. I said to my wife, ‘if you throw the ashes in the toilet, I get to see your bottom every day’.’

Six of the Charlie Hebdo journalists and staff members killed in Wednesday's attack are pictured together in this photo, taken in 2000. Circled top from left is Philippe Honore, Georges Wolinski, Bernard Maris and Jean Cabut. Below them on the stairs, from left, is editor Stephane Charbonnier and cartoonist Bernard ‘Tignous’ Verlhac

Six of the Charlie Hebdo journalists and staff members killed in Wednesday’s attack are pictured together in this photo, taken in 2000. Circled top from left is Philippe Honore, Georges Wolinski, Bernard Maris and Jean Cabut. Below them on the stairs, from left, is editor Stephane Charbonnier and cartoonist Bernard ‘Tignous’ Verlhac

Mr Wolinski was born in Tunis on June 28, 1934 to a Franco-Italian mother and a Polish Jewish father. He joined Hara-Kiri with Cabu in 1960 and became renowned for his cartoons, which spoofed politics and sexuality.

Bernard ‘Tignous’ Verlhac, was a renowned pacifist. The 57-year-old Parisian had been drawing for the French press since 1980 and originally made his name on comic publication L’idiot international.

Mourners were also last night paying tribute to Philippe Honore, a regular contributor to Charlie Hebdo who specialised in ‘literary puzzles’. The 73-year-old was born in Vichy, central France, and was first published aged just 16.

Victim Bernard Maris was a Left-wing economist, known to readers as ‘Uncle Bernard’. Heartbroken friends said the 68-year-old was a ‘cultured, kind and very tolerant man’.

Also killed was Michel Renaud, who did not work for Charlie Hebdo, but had been invited to the magazine’s offices as guest editor. He was the founder of ‘Rendez-vous de Carnet de Voyage’, a travel-themed art festival.

It has been reported that the final two victims are Frédéric Boisseau, a maintenance worker, and Elsa Cayat.

Ms Cayat, the only female victim of the gunmen, was a columnist and analyst for the magazine, according to Le Figaro.

Post mortems will be held on Thursday, according to reports citing the prosecutor of Paris, François Molins.

 

 

 

 

 

Source : Daily Mail

 

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